Autism Costs UK economy £28 billion

A new study into the economic impact of autism spectrum disorders in the UK has shown that the total estimated cost is £28 billion each year. That averages out at £500 each year for every man, woman and child in the country.

The study, published in this month's edition of the journal, Autism, includes estimates of the impact on the economy through lost productivity and says that further improvement in earlier intervention should considered and services across government and society in general should be better coordinated.

It combined data on prevalence, level of intellectual disability and place of residence with average annual costs of services and support, together with the opportunity costs of lost productivity. The costs of supporting children with ASDs were estimated to be £2.7 billion each year. For adults, these costs amount to £25 billion each year. The lifetime cost, after discounting, for someone with ASD and intellectual disability is estimated at approximately £1.23 million, and for someone with ASD without intellectual disability is approximately £0.80 million.

The research was carried out at King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, and the London School of Economics. Its authors found that, "At a time when the UK government is emphasising the need for higher rates of economic activity, and in particular is
trying to help people with disabilities and long-term conditions move into paid employment, the high costs of lost productivity stand out. Very few people with autism were in employment, which is hardly surprising given that there was little or no support to get them into work."

The study points out that the figures only show what was spent or lost and not what ought to be spent. Autism advocates feel this figure should be much more, particularly in the area of early intervention and appropriate education. Such help can ameliorate the effects of the disability for many people with ASD, particularly those at the higher functioning end of the spectrum with Asperger's Syndrome.

While the authors of this study emphasise that the costs presented do not provide an economic case for early intervention, they do highlight the importance of addressing that question. If early intervention could successfully change some aspects of behaviour that are cost-raising, both in childhood and subsequently, it may allow cost savings to be made and quality of life improvements to be achieved.

The research found that the range of sectors on which autism has an impact shows that there is  a need to ensure coordinated action across different parts of government and society more generally. It also said there was a need for a much better understanding of the cost and cost-effectiveness of various interventions and supports for children and adults to ensure that decision makers have a stronger evidence base when deciding how to allocate resources.

Study: Economic Cost of Autism: Martin Knapp, Renée Romeo and Jennifer Beecham, pub,  Autism http://aut.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/13/3/317

Follow

Tania Tirraoro

Founder, CEO at Special Needs Jungle
Founder of Special Needs Jungle. Parent of two sons with Asperger Syndrome.
Journalist & author of two novels and a guide to SEN statementing. PR & social media expert. Rare Disease & chronic pain patient advocate.
Tania Tirraoro
Follow

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.