The SEN Assessment Form – Yipes!

A few people have mentioned to me how daunting they find the form that comes for you to fill in to apply for a Statutory Assessment for your child. They're worried they'll forget something, they won't phrase what they want to say in the right way, or that they'll just do it all wrong and blow their chance.

I don't know how every LEA approaches the application; whether they all send out a form or whether some do it another way. Ours send a form with questions and boxes to write in your answers as a guideline to help parents know what to include. The LEA has made the form in the first place because they do actually want to help find out what a child's issues are. The problem is, it often makes the task more difficult because some people may think that's all they can put in, or leave stuff out that needs to be in because there was no obvious place to put it or stop at the end of the box because they think that's all they're allowed to write.

I would suggest putting the form to one side, sitting down at your computer or with pen and paper and just writing your child's story. You, bar no-one, know them the best. You are the one who has agonised over your child's progress, or lack thereof, you are the one who has more than likely wept over the fact that they don't fit in or just can't get to grips with things that other children have no trouble with at all.

Start at the beginning, from the day they were born. Note down any problems with the birth, unusual development, recurrent medical or social problems, how they get on with others and with school work. You will be amazed how much you can write and you'll probably shed a few more tears as you do it as well.

If you then want to fill in the form, you'll be able then to pull things out of your narrative to put in the spaces. Or just leave the form out altogether and redraft your narrative making sure you've covered all the questions on the form as well as everything else you want to say. This is your chance to put your child's case. If you're turned down for assessment you will be able to appeal, but the more relevant information you put in now, the less likely it is that you'll have to.

Refer to reports your child has had done and send copies of them along as well with your application. Go through the reports you have and pull out the parts that strengthen your case.

For example. "In his assessment on 21/4/06, Dr X remarked that Johnny has great potential but his lack of social skills was likely to adversely affect his learning. Please see report (numbered 7) enclosed with application."

Then number that report number 7 or whatever number you've given it, and enclose it with your application. You could then back this up with remarks teachers have made to you or with comments from Johnny's year end report, which you will also number and enclose.

If their writing is a problem, send in samples of it. If reading is a problem, write down the level they're reading at or perhaps that they avoid reading because they find it frustrating. If they are desperately unhappy because they are bullied because of their differences, mention this as well. If their frustration makes them angry and violent or unpredictable or friendless, write this down too.

But my best advice when approaching your application is to tell your child's story first and foremost. You don't need to be a world class writer, but do use the spell checker on your computer or get someone else to read it over for you if you're unsure. Enlist the help of a group such as Parent Partnership if you're lacking support.

No one knows your child like you do. Others, such as teachers, will have a different and valuable perspective, so speak to them and include what they say in your application. The SENCo will be asked in any event by the LEA to fill in their side of things but speaking to them yourself will inform you of things you may not have known.

Update: I've just added a help template under "SEN Assessment Form Part 2"

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Tania Tirraoro

Founder, CEO at Special Needs Jungle
Founder of Special Needs Jungle. Parent of two young adults with autism. Tania is a member of the Whole School SEND Expert Reference Group for SEND Leadership, the Ofsted SEND Inspections Stakeholders Group, and sits on the Advisory Board of the Royal Holloway, University of London Centre of Gene and Cell Therapy.
She is also an experienced broadcast and print journalist & author. Tania also runs a PR, web & social media consultancy, SocialOro Media. She is a Rare Disease & chronic pain patient advocate with Ehlers Danlos syndrome.
Tania Tirraoro
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