It’s Dyspraxia Awareness Week – be alert for early signs

The Dyspraxia Foundation is calling on families to be alert to the early signs of the condition in their awareness week campaign from 14th – 20th October 2012.

Chair of the Foundation Michele Lee said: “Many parents are unaware of the early signs of dyspraxia. It is vital families are on the lookout so we can ensure their children benefit from help and advice as soon as possible. All the research shows the earlier children are helped, the better their chances are for achieving their potential in the future. Early identification means that children can be referred for the help of specialists such as occupational therapy or physiotherapy whose input can be invaluable.”

“This year we have worked with CBeebies to develop a new early years programme, Tree Fu Tom, which encourages the development of foundation movement skills in all children, but especially those with dyspraxia. We are delighted that the series reached over 300,000 children aged 4-6 years in the first series and that parents are reporting improvements in their children’s motor skills and confidence”.

Dawn, mum of Rowan aged 5 years says “My son was diagnosed with dyspraxia by a consultant paediatrician last year. Rowan loves watching Tree Fu Tom with his younger sister and they both join in with the spells. Rowan tries really hard to master the movement sequences and takes this very seriously. He says that Tree Fu Tom is just like him!

With practice Rowan has got better at the spells and he doesn’t fall over as much. He’s also getting better at staying in one spot rather than migrating around the room, and he has started to be more aware of where his sister is when they are doing Big World Magic together

Early signs of dyspraxia can include:

  • Being late to achieve motor milestones such as sitting and walking
  • Some children avoid crawling or bottom shuffle instead
  • Frequently falling
  • Difficulty manipulating toys and other objects
  • Being a messy eater
  • Having speech/language problems
  • Slow to respond to instructions
  • Sensitivity to noise, touch and other sensory information

Dawn’s advice to other parents is “Be persistent. We felt that something wasn’t right for Rowan. He never jumped and couldn’t manage buttons or hold a pencil, but because he is a bright boy he compensated for his difficulties so they weren’t noticed by his nursery teachers. Fortunately our GP listened to our concerns and referred Rowan to the paediatrician for an assessment”.

Dawn also says: “It can be really hard to get help for young children with dyspraxia and it’s so frustrating trying to get your child to do things that they find difficult. We are so lucky to have Tree Fu Tom which is something fun that we can do with Rowan that we know will make a difference. There are lots of wonderful things that Rowan can do and it’s important to focus on them and not what other children are doing.”

If parents of pre-school children are concerned about their child’s development they should speak to their GP or Health Visitor. Further information about dyspraxia can be downloaded from www.dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk. All the advice and guidance produced by the Dyspraxia Foundation is written in consultation with people affected by dyspraxia and checked by professionals.

As part of Dyspraxia Awareness week a survey is being launched to gather information from parents about their early experiences of trying to get their child’s difficulties recognised. The survey findings will help to develop targeted resources to enable parents and early years professionals to recognise the early signs of dyspraxia and to provide the help and support these children need. A link to the survey will be available on the Dyspraxia Foundation website during Dyspraxia Awareness Week www.dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk

The Dyspraxia Foundation is also holding a two-day conference for parents and professionals in Bournemouth on 9/10th November 2012 with renowned speakers Dr. Madeleine Portwood, Barbara Hunter and Gill Dixon. Further information about the conference and a booking form is available from admin@dyspraxiafoundation.org.uk

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Tania Tirraoro

Founder, CEO at Special Needs Jungle
Founder of Special Needs Jungle. Parent of two sons with Asperger Syndrome.
Journalist & author of two novels and a guide to SEN statementing. PR & social media expert. Rare Disease & chronic pain patient advocate.
Tania Tirraoro
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6 Comments

  1. jellybelly123

    It’s very necessary to understand the difference between different type of child disorders for right handling of the disorder, becasue if you will go for a different treatment for a particular problem, then obviously you are not going to be benefited.
    Awareness is must.

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