SEN and disability stories you mustn’t miss

The summer holidays may be underway but the silly season for news certainly doesn't seem to have arrived as far as news and great blogs go. Although, as this is Olympics year, we may miss it altogether. I'm especially pleased as the Olympics brings some old and sorely-missed friends into town to cover it for various news organisations.

In special needs this week, there have been a number of notable stories, including the school exclusions figures. the BBC ran on the angle that there was an 11% drop in exclusions across the boar and, while this is of course welcome news, it's much more worrying that pupils with statements are nine times more likely to be excluded than a pupil without SEN, a fact that news organisations seem to think is just par for the course. Now remember, this is statemented, not just SEN kids, so these are children who are supposed to have statutory help in place to enable them to achieve. Does this indicate that many are simply n the wrong school environment or that their statements are either inadequate or not being properly implemented? I really hope someone with the right resources (yes, I know, what are resources?) looks into this more closely.

There are also a few great blog posts from Chaos in Kent, Lynsey Mumma Duck and Place2Be, so do check them out. Also, if you've read or written something fab this week about special needs, leave the link in the comments for me!

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Tania Tirraoro

Founder, CEO at Special Needs Jungle
Founder of Special Needs Jungle. Parent of two young adults with autism. Tania is a member of the Whole School SEND Expert Reference Group for SEND Leadership, the Ofsted SEND Inspections Stakeholders Group, and sits on the Advisory Board of the Royal Holloway, University of London Centre of Gene and Cell Therapy.
She is also an experienced broadcast and print journalist & author. Tania also runs a PR, web & social media consultancy, SocialOro Media. She is a Rare Disease & chronic pain patient advocate with Ehlers Danlos syndrome.
Tania Tirraoro
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