A spin around The Autism Show

Last Saturday, Debs and I visited The Autism Show at London's Excel. Poor Debs fell over the dog a couple of days earlier and has her wrist in a splint so my long-suffering husband, Marco, came along as chief wheelchair-pusher and photographer, so thank you to him for putting up with my constant requests to go, stop, get closer, further away and turn left and left (I can't remember right).

It was great to put faces to names and we excitedly foisted lots of our brand new SNJ pens onto people whether they wanted one or not.

We had an interesting chat with Mark Hayes from Autism Eye which is a great publication - free copies were available at the show. The magazine is also available as a digital download as well.

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Tania, Anna Kennedy, Debs

It was a whistlestop tour as I had to dash back to watch Son1 play bass in the school Jazz Band at a local Fayre  (they were splendiferous, if you like jazz take a peek at this. You can't really see Son1, he's the blond kid right at the back). Because of this we didn't get time to see the Autism's Got Talent show, but we did meet and have a chat with its founder, the tireless Anna Kennedy. Among her many achievements, Anna has started her own autism school, published a dance DVD for people with autism and hosted many, many events to improve the lives of young people with ASD, as well as having her own special needs children.

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Peter from SEN Mag, Tania & Debs

I was also delighted to meet in person, Peter Sutcliffe, the Editor of SEN Magazine. I have written for SEN Magazine in the past and subscribe myself - it's a great source of information and ideas!

The award winning team from SEN Assist were also there. They make educational software for children with SEN and Adele, the company's founder also works at Freemantles Special School, so she has plenty of young people to test her products on!

There were lots of stands with interesting resources, specialist schools, sensory equipment, legal services, and even products made by young people with autism from LVS Oxford. They teach their students real skills they can use in adult life, which of course, brings with it increased confidence and self-esteem. I bought some of their lavender sachets, my favourite scent (very old fashioned, I know!) Son2 decided when we got home that as he is a fan of lavender as well, I must have bought them for him. I have not seen them since but his room is smelling suspiciously fragrant.

IPSEA were on hand to give free advice in private cubicles and there was a big presence of course from the NAS and Ambitious About Autism

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Evelyn Hope Ashford & Debs

One great resource we will be featuring in more depth soon is Advocacy Service, Education Equality founded by Evelyn Hope Ashford. It is a low-cost advocacy SEN service and their advocates can also accompany you to meetings, tribunals and so on. Check out their website for more information.

We met so many amazing people in such a short amount of time! I really think the world of special needs is blessed to have so many energetic, dedicated and just bloody amazing people working to help children with SEN/D. Many, if not most of them are in the sector because of their own direct experience as parents of children with disabilities.

Finally, I end the post with an apology. I was due to co-present with Debs at the Wordswell Towards a Positive Future conference this Thursday. Unfortunately, I have realised after the weekend's activities of Autism Show, Fayre and supermarket (how very dare I!) left me too exhausted to move on Monday, that it's just not possible for me to manage the demands of travel and a day long conference. EDS and PoTS strike again!

However, Debs will be holding the SNJ fort and she has a brilliant presentation about parental co-production. I understand there are just a few places left, so if you are near London or can travel, tickets are just £30 for parents including lunch - and the chance to meet Debs of course and grab an SNJ pen - who could resist?

Other presentations will be from IPSEA's Jane McConnell and Child Psychologist Charlie Mead, both of whom I am very sad to be missing. I am a great admirer of Jane and Charlie is one of my heroes for his brilliant work with vulnerable children.

If you do go, let me know your feedback - it's a great line-up and our Debs is a complete star; I'm so proud to have her with me on Special Needs Jungle. We have lots of exciting things lined up in the next few months. The TES logo top left is a clue!

Did you go to The Autism Show? What did you think?

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Tania Tirraoro

Founder, CEO at Special Needs Jungle
Founder of Special Needs Jungle. Parent of two sons with Asperger Syndrome.
Journalist & author of two novels and a guide to SEN statementing. PR & social media expert. Rare Disease & chronic pain patient advocate.
Tania Tirraoro
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