Where do KS4 and KS5 students go – when they have SEN?

In January, the DfE published a “Statitistical First Release” showing a breakdown of where children/young adults go to when they leave school or further education.

The 2012/13 report looks at the destinations of those leaving KS4 (Years 10 and 11) and those leaving KS5 (FE or Sixth form). This would represent those young people in key stage 4 (KS4) and key stage 5 (KS5) in 2011/12.

  • The report was based on pupils from state-funded mainstream schools and colleges.
  • The report looked at “sustained destinations.”   A sustained destination is one where the young people stay for at least the first two terms of the year after they completed KS4 or 5.

SNJ where nowWhere did the young people go after Key Stage 4 (years 10/11)

Key Stage 4 – Overall – ALL children and young people

  • 88% went into sustained education destination
    • 34% went to a Further Education College
    • 38% went to Sixth Form school
    • 12% went to Sixth Form College
    • 4% went to “other”
    • “other” includes independent school, other FE providers, specifialist post-16 provision, alternative provision or PRU, special school, UK HEI or sustained education combination destination
  • 1% went to employment and/or training
  • 1% went to education/employment/training combination
  • 7% - did not sustain, were recorded NEET or unknown

Key Stage 4 – With a Statement of SEN:

  • 85% in sustained education destination
    • 56% to a Further Education College
    • 19% to Sixth Form School
    • 5% to Sixth Form College
    • 6% to “other”
  • 2% went to employment and/or training
  • 1% went to education/employment/training combination
  • 12% - did not sustain, were recorded NEET or unknown

Key Stage 4 – with School Action/School Action +

  • 79% in sustained education destination
    • 46% to a Further Education College
    • 21% to Sixth Form School
    • 7% to Sixth Form College
    • 5% to “other”
  • 3% went to employment and/or training
  • 2% went to education/employment/training combination
  • 17% - did not sustain, were recorded NEET or unknown

So, in 2012/13 after Key stage 4, young people with a statement of SEN or who were on School Action or School Action plus were

  • Less likely to go into sustained education than their peers
  • More likely to go to a Further Education College
  • Less likely to go to a Sixth Form School or College
  • More likely to go to “other” provision
  • More likely to go to education/employment/training if School Action/+
  • More likely to not sustain education, employment or training, be recorded NEET or unknown

Pupils from special schools – Key Stage 4:

94% of pupils at non-maintained special schools were recorded in an education, training or employment destination in 2012/13 after KS4; 93% went to a sustained education destination. This compares with 86% and 84% respectively for pupils from maintained special schools.

71% of pupils from non-maintained special schools remained in the special school sector after key stage 4 and 17% went to a FE college. 44% of pupils from maintained special schools went on to a special school and 31% went to a FE college.

Where did the young people go after Key Stage 5 (sixth form, further education)

Key Stage 5 – Overall – ALL children and young people

  • 63% went into sustained education destination
    • 48% to Higher Education Institution (HEI)
    • 16% to top third of HEI
    • 11% to Russell Group (including Oxford/Cambridge)
    • 16% to “other”
      • Other includes an FE College, independent school, other further education provider, school sixth form, sixth form college, specialist provision and education combination.
    • 6% went to employment and/or training
    • 1% went to education/employment/training combination
    • 29% did not sustain, were recorded NEET or unknown

Key Stage 5 – With SEN (recorded for students in schools):

  • 66% went into sustained education destination
    • 47% to Higher Education Institution (HEI)
    • 13% to top third of HEI
    • 8% to Russell Group (including Oxford/Cambridge)
    • 19% to “other”
  • 7% went to employment and/or training
  • 1% went to education/employment/training combination
  • 26% - did not sustain, were recorded NEET or unknown

Key Stage 5 – with Learning Difficulties or Disabilities (recorded for students in colleges)

  • 56% went into sustained education destination
    • 35% to Higher Education Institution (HEI)
    • 7% to top third of HEI
    • 4% to Russell Group (including Oxford/Cambridge)
    • 21% to “other”
  • 7% went to employment and/or training
  • 1% went to education/employment/training combination
  • 37% - did not sustain, were recorded NEET or unknown

So, in 2012/13 after Key Stage 5, young people with SEN or LDD were:

  • More likely to go into sustained education if SEN
  • Less likely to go into sustained education if LDD
  • Less likely to go to Higher Education Institution
  • Less likely to go to top third of HEI
  • Less likely to go to Russell Group
  • More likely to go to “other” provision
  • More likely to not sustain, be recorded NEET or unknown

Pupils from special schools – Key Stage 5:

Of the 120 students who completed level 3 qualifications in special schools, 77% were included in a sustained education, employment or training destination after KS5; 76% were in a sustained education destination.

Why?

  • Why do our children go to more further education colleges than sixth forms?
  • Why do more of our children not sustain education, employment or training after they leave education?
  • Why are children on school action/plus less likely to go into education/employment/training combination?

We can see there is a clear difference in what the future can hold for our children, dependent on whether they have a statement, are on school action or action plus and whether they have a label of SEN or LDD within school or college.

Is any of this a surprise to you?  Is there anything you think needs to be changed?

Debs Aspland
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Debs Aspland

Exec Director at Bringing Us Together
Mum of 3, wife of 1, Exec Director of Bringing Us Together, Owner of Inspiring Circles, Writer of Chaos in Kent, Development - South at Community Circles
Debs Aspland
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